Health Insurance Coverage of the Total Population

The following article breaks down insurance coverage in the United States by state and type of coverage, if any. This data is from 2015, the most recent data available.

Employer: Includes those covered by employer-sponsored coverage either through their own job or as a dependent in the same household.

HC Employer Coverage

Medicare: Includes those covered by Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and those who have Medicare and another type of non-Medicaid coverage where Medicare is the primary payer. Excludes those with Medicare Part A coverage only and those covered by Medicare and Medicaid (dual eligibles).

HC Medicare Coverage

Medicaid: Includes those covered by Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and those who have both Medicaid and another type of coverage, such as dual eligibles who are also covered by Medicare.

HC Medicaid Coverage

Other Public: Includes those covered under the military or Veterans Administration.

HC Other Public Coverage

Non-Group: Includes individuals and families that purchased or are covered as a dependent by non-group insurance.

HC Non-group Coverage

Uninsured: Includes those without health insurance and those who have coverage under the Indian Health Service only.

HC Uninsured

Below is a table with the exact percentages of coverage overall and by state:

Location Employer Non-Group Medicaid Medicare Other Public Uninsured
United States 49% 7% 20% 14% 2% 9%
Alabama 46% 6% 19% 15% 4% 11%
Alaska 50% 3% 18% 9% 7% 13%
Arizona 41% 4% 25% 14% 3% 13%
Arkansas 44% 7% 22% 16% 2% 9%
California 45% 9% 26% 10% 2% 8%
Colorado 50% 6% 19% 13% 3% 9%
Connecticut 52% 8% 19% 13% N/A 6%
Delaware 53% 5% 18% 14% 3% 7%
District of Columbia 52% 8% 26% 10% N/A 4%
Florida 39% 10% 18% 18% 3% 13%
Georgia 46% 6% 19% 13% 3% 14%
Hawaii 52% 3% 18% 15% 8% 5%
Idaho 48% 8% 18% 14% 1% 11%
Illinois 54% 6% 19% 14% 1% 6%
Indiana 52% 5% 19% 14% 1% 9%
Iowa 53% 8% 17% 15% 1% 5%
Kansas 54% 7% 13% 13% 2% 10%
Kentucky 45% 9% 22% 16% N/A 6%
Louisiana 46% 7% 20% 13% N/A 11%
Maine 47% 5% 23% 18% 2% 5%
Maryland 58% 6% 15% 12% 2% 7%
Massachusetts 54% 5% 23% 12% 1% 4%
Michigan 53% 6% 19% 16% N/A 6%
Minnesota 56% 8% 14% 15% 1% 6%
Mississippi 41% 5% 23% 15% 3% 13%
Missouri 56% 7% 13% 15% 1% 9%
Montana 46% 6% 16% 17% 4% 10%
Nebraska 55% 7% 13% 13% N/A 8%
Nevada 46% 7% 17% 13% 5% 11%
New Hampshire 61% 5% 13% 14% N/A 5%
New Jersey 55% 6% 18% 13% N/A 8%
New Mexico 37% 5% 27% 15% 3% 12%
New York 49% 7% 24% 13% N/A 6%
North Carolina 48% 7% 18% 13% N/A 11%
North Dakota 57% 8% 10% 14% 3% 8%
Ohio 52% 5% 21% 15% 1% 6%
Oklahoma 46% 7% 17% 14% 3% 13%
Oregon 46% 7% 24% 14% 2% 7%
Pennsylvania 55% 5% 18% 16% 1% 6%
Rhode Island 57% 7% 17% 13% N/A 5%
South Carolina 46% 6% 19% 16% 2% 11%
South Dakota 53% 9% 14% 14% N/A 9%
Tennessee 45% 6% 19% 16% N/A 11%
Texas 48% 7% 16% 11% 3% 16%
Utah 59% 7% 12% 10% N/A 10%
Vermont 51% 7% 20% 14% 3% 5%
Virginia 53% 8% 11% 14% 5% 9%
Washington 50% 6% 22% 14% 2% 7%
West Virginia 40% 4% 29% 19% 1% 6%
Wisconsin 55% 6% 17% 14% 1% 7%
Wyoming 56% 7% 10% 14% 4% 9%

Notes

The majority of our health coverage topics are based on analysis of the Census Bureau’s March Supplement to the Current Population Survey (the CPS Annual Social and Economic Supplement or ASEC) by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. The CPS supplement is the primary source of annual health insurance coverage information in the United States.

In this analysis, income (mostly categorized as a percent of the federal poverty level) is aggregated by Census-defined family units. Analyzing income by family unit captures income available to a group of people who are likely sharing resources. However, family units may not be the appropriate measure for capturing eligibility for health insurance. Eligibility for health insurance is more accurately estimated using “health insurance units,” which may be counted differently for different types of insurance (such as Medicaid or employer coverage).

Data exclude a small number of people with private coverage of an unknown source. Data may not sum to totals due to rounding and the exclusion of these people.

Sources

Kaiser Family Foundation estimates based on the Census Bureau's March 2014, March 2015, and March 2016 Current Population Survey (CPS: Annual Social and Economic Supplements).

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