Environment & Climate Change

Climate Change Fact Sheet v5

Latest

  • New York, divest pensions from the fossil fuel companies that are accelerating global warming

    October 2017

    Forget the bizarre tweets and insults from the White House, or the images of the President touring San Juan: What’s happened in Puerto Rico will change life there for many years after all the news has faded from your feed.

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  • Big Oil Will Have to Pay Up, Like Big Tobacco

    September 2017

    Here is a message to investors in the oil industry, whether pension and insurance funds, university endowments, hedge funds or other asset managers: Your investments are going to sour. The growing devastation caused by climate change, as seen this month in Texas, Florida and the Caribbean, are going to blow a hole in your fossil-fuel portfolio.

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  • Stop Talking Right Now About The Threat Of Climate Change. It’s Here; It’s Happening

    September 2017

    "For the sake of keeping things manageable, let’s confine the discussion to a single continent and a single week: North America over the last seven days."

    This article looks solely at the devastating effects that the recent hurricanes have had on North America and their link to climate change. McKibben uses these events to galvanize Americans and the world to look beyond day to day life and take steps to begin addressing the dangerous trajectory that we are on.

    "We have to seize the moment we’re in right now - the moment when we’re scared and vulnerable – and use it to dramatically reorient ourselves."

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  • Be Part of the Solution

    September 2017

    What Houston and the rest of the world are up against is physics. As we've heated the planet by burning fossil fuel, certain things have changed. Since warm air can hold more water vapor than cold air, for instance, the stage has been set for previously unimaginable rainstorms like the one that accompanied Harvey.

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  • Hurricane Harvey: The link to climate change

    August 2017

    It is extremely difficult to link one weather event to climate change. This article pulls together differing opinions on the role that climate change had on the disaster in Houston.

    Some see a direct link between climate change and the hurricane: "

    "The waters of the Gulf of Mexico are about 1.5 degrees warmer above what they were from 1980-2010...That is very significant because it means the potential for a stronger storm is there, and the contribution of global warming to the warmer waters in the Gulf, it's almost inevitable that there was a contribution to that." and that  "This is the type of event, in terms of the extreme rainfall, that we would expect to see more of in a warming climate"

    However, some admit that it is hard to create a causal link due to lack of resources: "

    "For hurricanes, we would ask the question as to what are the possible hurricane developments in the world we live in and compare that to the possible hurricane developments in a world without climate change... These high-resolution models are very expensive to run over and over again so that you can simulate possible weather rather than tracks of hurricanes."

    Finally, the article mentions an approach that is not as frequently seen in these types of discussions: "

    "The hurricane is just a storm, it is not the disaster... The disaster is the fact that Houston population has increased by 40% since 1990. The disaster is the fact that many people were too poor to afford insurance or evacuate."

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  • Assessing ExxonMobil's Climate Change Communications (1977–2014)

    August 2017

    "On the question of whether ExxonMobil misled non-scientific audiences about climate science, our analysis supports the conclusion that it did."

    This report from IOP Science "assesses whether ExxonMobil Corporation has in the past misled the general public about climate change." It analyses 187 pieces of documentation that Exxon wrote and disseminated between 1977 and 2014 "including peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed publications, internal company documents, and paid, editorial-style advertisements ('advertorials') in The New York Times." The report concludes that "ExxonMobil contributed to advancing climate science-by way of its scientists' academic publications—but promoted doubt about it in advertorials. Given this discrepancy, we conclude that ExxonMobil misled the public."

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  • The Unimaginable is Now Possible: 100% Renewable Energy. We Can't Settle for Less.

    August 2017

    The knock on environmentalists is that they've been better at opposing than proposing. Sure, being against overheating the planet or melting the ice caps should probably speak for itself-but it doesn’t give us a means. So it’s important news that the environmental movement seems to be rallying round a new flag. That standard bears a number: 100 percent.

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