Activism

  • 03.06.18

    Student Activism: A Force for Change

    This month, a school full of children suffered an enormous tragedy. Again. Seventeen young people were gunned down inside a Florida high school but instead of devolving into the same cycle of meaningless debate, we're seeing a new moment of student leadership. In a time of crushing grief and anger and fear, these ...

    This month, a school full of children suffered an enormous tragedy. Again.

    Seventeen young people were gunned down inside a Florida high school but instead of devolving into the same cycle of meaningless debate, we’re seeing a new moment of student leadership. In a time of crushing grief and anger and fear, these students have chosen to rise up and fill the vacuum of leadership that many of our leaders have created. And they’ve been joined in their activism by their peers all across the country.

  • 05.04.15

    What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

    "The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have th...

    "The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else."

    This article from The ADA National Networks gives a succinct summary of the ADA, what it is and who it covers. The different sections are as follows:

    Title I: Equal Employment Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities. "This title is designed to help people with disabilities access the same employment opportunities and benefits available to people without disabilities."

    Title II: Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services. This title "prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in all programs, activities, and services of public entities."

    Title III: Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and in Commercial Facilities. This title "prohibits private places of public accommodation from discriminating against individuals with disabilities. Examples of public accommodations include privately-owned, leased or operated facilities like hotels, restaurants, retail merchants, doctor’s offices, golf courses, private schools, day care centers, health clubs, sports stadiums, movie theaters, and so on."

    Title IV: Telecommunications. "This title requires telephone and Internet companies to provide a nationwide system of interstate and intrastate telecommunications relay services that allows individuals with hearing and speech disabilities to communicate over the telephone."

    Title V: Miscellaneous Provisions. "The final title contains a variety of provisions relating to the ADA as a whole, including its relationship to other laws, state immunity, its impact on insurance providers and benefits, prohibition against retaliation and coercion, illegal use of drugs, and attorney’s fees."

  • 11.14.11

    Harry Belafonte Reflects On Life As A Singer, Actor, And Activist

    In this interview, Harry Belafonte reflects on his life as an activist, singer, and actor, and describes that to him, they are not separate career paths. Belafonte explains that "What attracted me to the arts was that I saw theater as a social force, a political force." He goes on to explain his relationships wi...

    In this interview, Harry Belafonte reflects on his life as an activist, singer, and actor, and describes that to him, they are not separate career paths. 

    Belafonte explains that "What attracted me to the arts was that I saw theater as a social force, a political force."

    He goes on to explain his relationships with some of the leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, his friendship and connection with MLK. He even speaks about King's legacy beyond just the United States. 

    When asked about his connection to leaders around the world who have not consistently been seen as American allies, he defends his choice by saying that it is important to be open to people from all over the world who have different view points than ours.