MLK

  • 04.04.18

    It's Our Job To Finish Dr. Martin Luther King's Economic Justice Work

    I recently travelled to Memphis to headline an event at the National Civil Rights Museum in the Lorraine Motel, the place the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968....

    I recently travelled to Memphis to headline an event at the National Civil Rights Museum in the Lorraine Motel, the place the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968.

    Tags: MLK, Economy
  • 03.01.18

    Harry Belafonte On His Inspirations, Activism, and Confronting Racism

    "Artists are the gatekeepers of truth."...

    "Artists are the gatekeepers of truth." 

  • 01.09.18

    Harry Belafonte Reflects on Friendship with Martin Luther King Jr

    In 1964, when they were both 37, Harry Belafonte and his friend Sidney Poitier traveled to the town of Greenwood, Miss. As the two entertainers made their journey to meet with members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, they were chased and shot at by the Ku Klux Klan. But they succeeded in their miss...

    In 1964, when they were both 37, Harry Belafonte and his friend Sidney Poitier traveled to the town of Greenwood, Miss. As the two entertainers made their journey to meet with members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, they were chased and shot at by the Ku Klux Klan. But they succeeded in their mission. They hand-delivered a doctor’s bag filled with $70,000, money collected in a series of small fundraisers, to help with the student committee’s voter registration effort.

  • 11.14.11

    Harry Belafonte Reflects On Life As A Singer, Actor, And Activist

    In this interview, Harry Belafonte reflects on his life as an activist, singer, and actor, and describes that to him, they are not separate career paths. Belafonte explains that "What attracted me to the arts was that I saw theater as a social force, a political force." He goes on to explain his relationships wi...

    In this interview, Harry Belafonte reflects on his life as an activist, singer, and actor, and describes that to him, they are not separate career paths. 

    Belafonte explains that "What attracted me to the arts was that I saw theater as a social force, a political force."

    He goes on to explain his relationships with some of the leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, his friendship and connection with MLK. He even speaks about King's legacy beyond just the United States. 

    When asked about his connection to leaders around the world who have not consistently been seen as American allies, he defends his choice by saying that it is important to be open to people from all over the world who have different view points than ours. 

  • 01.11.67

    A Freedom Budget For All Americans

    In the fall of 1965 A. Philip Randolph, prominent economists, allies from the labor movement and others who had participated in the 1963 March on Washington, began working on what they called "A Freedom Budget For All Americans".[1] John Nichols writing fifty years later in The Nation (United States) listed as its ...

    In the fall of 1965 A. Philip Randolph, prominent economists, allies from the labor movement and others who had participated in the 1963 March on Washington, began working on what they called "A Freedom Budget For All Americans".[1] John Nichols writing fifty years later in The Nation (United States) listed as its goals "the abolition of poverty, guaranteed full employment, fair prices for farmers, fair wages for workers, housing and healthcare for all, the establishment of progressive tax, and fiscal policies that respected the needs of working families."[2]

    Bayard Rustin, and Martin Luther King, Jr., worked with Randolph on the Freedom Budget document which was advanced in 1966, determined to win the "full and final triumph of the civil rights movement, to be achieved by going beyond civil rights, linking the goal of racial justice with the goal of economic justice for all people in the United States" and doing so "by rallying massive segments of the 99% of the American people in a powerfully democratic and moral crusade."[3] The proposals of Freedom Budget included a job guarantee for everyone ready and willing to work, a guaranteed income for those unable to work or those who should not be working, and a living wage to lift the working poor out of poverty; such policies provided the cornerstones for King’s Poor People's Campaign.[4]

    A Freedom Budget For All Americans