VA

  • 07.16.18

    The Private Sector & Climate Change: Holding Corporations Accountable

    The future or our planet depends on us taking action against climate change. The United States of America needs to take a closer look at the economic policies that encourage and allow companies to contribute to climate change and global warming. In this video, Bill McKibben addresses some of the ways that we can h...

    The future or our planet depends on us taking action against climate change. The United States of America needs to take a closer look at the economic policies that encourage and allow companies to contribute to climate change and global warming.

    In this video, Bill McKibben addresses some of the ways that we can hold corporations accountable and stop actions that negatively affect the environment: we must get money out of politics, encourage taxes that reflect the true cost of pollution, incentivize the right types of activities, and get the penalties right when companies harm the environment.

  • 04.12.18

    Facebook And The Future of Online Privacy

    The EU has taken the lead in responding to abuse by the likes of Facebook, thanks to its new privacy standards and proposed greater taxation of peddlers of online personal data. Yet more is needed and feasible....

    The EU has taken the lead in responding to abuse by the likes of Facebook, thanks to its new privacy standards and proposed greater taxation of peddlers of online personal data. Yet more is needed and feasible.

  • 08.31.16

    Review of the Federal Bureau of Prisons’ Monitoring of Contract Prisons

    In 1997 the Bureau of Prisons started contracting privately operated institutions (private prisons/contract prisons.)"As of December 2015, contract prisons housed roughly 22,660 of these federal inmates, or approximately 12 percent of the BOP's total inmate population." This article is the executive summary taken f...

    In 1997 the Bureau of Prisons started contracting privately operated institutions (private prisons/contract prisons.)"As of December 2015, contract prisons housed roughly 22,660 of these federal inmates, or approximately 12 percent of the BOP’s total inmate population." This article is the executive summary taken from a Bureau of Prisons report.

    The report finds that:

    • In a majority of the categories  examined, contract prisons incurred more safety and security incidents per capita than comparable BOP institutions.

    • With the exception of fewer incidents of positive drug tests and sexual misconduct, the contract prisons had more incidents per capita than the BOP institutions in all of the other categories of data we examined. For example, the contract prisons confiscated eight times as many contraband cell phones annually on average as the BOP institutions. Contract prisons also had higher rates of assaults, both by inmates on other inmates and by inmates on staff.

    • The three contract prisons we visited were all cited by the BOP for one or more safety and security deficiencies, including administrative infractions

    • Two of the three contract prisons we visited were improperly housing new inmates in Special Housing Units, which are normally used for disciplinary or administrative segregation, until beds became available in general population housing.

    The report concludes that the Bureau of Prisons needs to reevaluate how it monitors contract prisons in order to ensure the safety of inmates, and the prisons' compliance with the law.

  • 02.14.16

    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: Honoring Veterans Needs To Go Beyond Lip Service

    In this speech, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard talks about the need to take care of the veterans who have dedicated their lives to keeping this country safe.  She begins with a personal story about members of the military who have given the ultimate sacrifice. Then she turns to what she, and the country, can do to help those ...

    In this speech, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard talks about the need to take care of the veterans who have dedicated their lives to keeping this country safe. 

    She begins with a personal story about members of the military who have given the ultimate sacrifice. Then she turns to what she, and the country, can do to help those who have been lucky enough to come back. Gabbard laments the healthcare situation for servicemen and their families - having to wait months for care. She asks what our response would be to that situation "if that was your son or daughter who had been blown up by an IED who is told to wait 6 months to see a doctor."

    Rep. Gabbard uses the speech to galvanize Americans to re-commit to honoring and taking care of those that put their lives on the line.

    "I will never accept defeat. I will never leave a fallen comrade. We will never neglect those who are sick or in need...Let us strengthen our resolve so that we honor our friends and fight for them."

  • 11.08.15

    Wait Time at VA Exposed Failures

    "The effect and cost of war on our troops is undeniable. It takes a toll on the toughest among them. Coming home should offer peace and a chance to heal." In this op ed, Rep. Gabbard argues that the present neglect of veterans is unacceptable. "Last year, our country's failure to fulfill its promise to our veteran...

    "The effect and cost of war on our troops is undeniable. It takes a toll on the toughest among them. Coming home should offer peace and a chance to heal."

    In this op ed, Rep. Gabbard argues that the present neglect of veterans is unacceptable. "Last year, our country's failure to fulfill its promise to our veterans was starkly exposed. At the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), veterans faced wait times of 90 days or more to see a doctor."

    Gabbard talks about legislation that she had put forward: "The bill's premise, to allow veterans to get the immediate care they need from non-VA medical providers, was ultimately included in the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act that was enacted last year." Yet she argues that this is not enough. 

     "After serving and sacrificing for all of us, every single veteran should come home knowing that we are there for them, and we have their back."

  • 11.01.15

    United States Department Of Veterans Affairs: Research Highlights 2015

    This report prepared by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs includes a few quick facts related to veteran populations, occupations and years of service. ...

    This report prepared by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs includes a few quick facts related to veteran populations, occupations and years of service. 

    Veterans Highlights Report 1

  • 06.03.11

    What Happens When The Government Tightens Its Belt? (Part II)

    In this article Stephanie Kelton describes the relationship between the government, the private sector, and foreign entities. She describes that when you look at these three players in the economy, one entity's purchase is another entity's sale. Therefore, any surplus for one entity equates to a deficit for anoth...

    In this article Stephanie Kelton describes the relationship between the government, the private sector, and foreign entities. 

    She describes that when you look at these three players in the economy, one entity's purchase is another entity's sale. Therefore, any surplus for one entity equates to a deficit for another. In more simplistic terms: wen we have a trade deficit and are importing in more goods than we are exporting, that means that when compared to us foreign entities are exporting more goods to the U.S. than they are importing from the U.S. 

    Kelton specifically points out that the government has a role to play to offset the trade deficit that this country has because, "Whenever the government’s deficit is too small to offset a deficit in the current account, the private sector will experience a net loss."

    She concludes that: "the Government needs to loosen its belt when we tighten ours. If it doesn’t, then millions of us will lose our [jobs]."

    Kelton Figure 2 (Part 2)

More