ADA

  • 05.04.15

    What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

    "The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have th...

    "The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else."

    This article from The ADA National Networks gives a succinct summary of the ADA, what it is and who it covers. The different sections are as follows:

    Title I: Equal Employment Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities. "This title is designed to help people with disabilities access the same employment opportunities and benefits available to people without disabilities."

    Title II: Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services. This title "prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in all programs, activities, and services of public entities."

    Title III: Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and in Commercial Facilities. This title "prohibits private places of public accommodation from discriminating against individuals with disabilities. Examples of public accommodations include privately-owned, leased or operated facilities like hotels, restaurants, retail merchants, doctor’s offices, golf courses, private schools, day care centers, health clubs, sports stadiums, movie theaters, and so on."

    Title IV: Telecommunications. "This title requires telephone and Internet companies to provide a nationwide system of interstate and intrastate telecommunications relay services that allows individuals with hearing and speech disabilities to communicate over the telephone."

    Title V: Miscellaneous Provisions. "The final title contains a variety of provisions relating to the ADA as a whole, including its relationship to other laws, state immunity, its impact on insurance providers and benefits, prohibition against retaliation and coercion, illegal use of drugs, and attorney’s fees."

  • 12.01.14

    Healthcare Systems In The U.S. And Other Countries Explained

    Healthcare in the United States is comprised of a mixture of both private and public components listed below: 1) PRIVATE: About 60% of citizens get health insurance from their employer. 2) MEDICARE: 15% of Americans are covered by Medicare (and most of them are elderly people.) "Medicare is a national social ins...

    Healthcare in the United States is comprised of a mixture of both private and public components listed below:

    1) PRIVATE: About 60% of citizens get health insurance from their employer. 

    2) MEDICARE: 15% of Americans are covered by Medicare (and most of them are elderly people.) "Medicare is a national social insurance program run and administered by the federal government." It is the closest thing to a single payer system in the U.S. The video then explains the differences among the different types of Medicare (A, B, Medigap, etc.).

    3) MEDICAID: Medicaid is a state run program that is supposed to provide care for those at the low end of the social economic spectrum. There are minimum federal guidelines that are set for Medicaid and then each state gets to implement it as it sees fit." The video then explains the Medicaid expansion. 

    4) THE VA: Veterans Health Administration (socialized medicine) and Tricare (private).

    The video ends with the observation that, "Interestingly, while about two thirds of people get their insurance from private companies, only about one third of spending comes from the private sector. In other words, the Government has to cover about one third of people in the United States but has to pay about two thirds of the bill."