Felony

  • 04.20.18

    Felon Disenfranchisement

    6.1 million Americans cannot vote because of felony disenfranchisement. Ultimately, these men and women across the United States have little to no political recourse for challenging the laws that took away their vote....

    6.1 million Americans cannot vote because of felony disenfranchisement. Ultimately, these men and women across the United States have little to no political recourse for challenging the laws that took away their vote.

  • 06.30.16

    The Price We Pay: Economic Costs of Barriers to Employment for Former Prisoners and People Convicted of Felonies

    This article from the Center for Economic and Policy Priorities looks at employment within the former prison population as well as those with felony convictions. The report finds that "hat there were between 14 and 15.8 million working-age people with felony convictions in 2014, of whom between 6.1 and 6.9 million...

    This article from the Center for Economic and Policy Priorities looks at employment within the former prison population as well as those with felony convictions.

    The report finds that "hat there were between 14 and 15.8 million working-age people with felony convictions in 2014, of whom between 6.1 and 6.9 million were former prisoners." These individuals face a number of barriers to employment including "erosion of basic job skills, disruption of formal education, and the loss of social networks that can improve job-finding prospects. Those with felony convictions also face legal restrictions that lock them out of many government jobs and licensed professions."

    As a result, "this report finds that there was a 0.9 to 1.0 percentage-point reduction in the overall employment rate in 2014, equivalent to the loss of 1.7 to 1.9 million workers. In terms of the cost to the economy as a whole, this suggests a loss of about $78 to $87 billion in annual GDP."