Hawaii

  • 11.19.17

    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Speaks at Kuleana Academy, Recognizes Hawaii Student Participants at Model United Nations, Highlights Ongoing Challenges Facing Puerto Rico

    Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) met with participants of the Kuleana Academy, a four-month leadership development and non-partisan candidate training program designed to educate and train grassroots leaders who have a desire to serve in public office, or as community organizers. The congresswoman answered quest...

    Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) met with participants of the Kuleana Academy, a four-month leadership development and non-partisan candidate training program designed to educate and train grassroots leaders who have a desire to serve in public office, or as community organizers. The congresswoman answered questions from the group on getting involved in politics, working with local advocacy groups, working in a bipartisan way to deliver results, and more.

  • 04.11.17

    From Standing Rock To Maui: Tulsi Gabbard Joins Resistance To A&B’s Massive Water Theft

    Many people have heard about the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Native community's struggle against it. However, this type of struggle is not unique to that one area of the country. In Maui, Hawaii, residents are facing a similar struggle against corporations about their access to water: "Instead of paying market ...

    Many people have heard about the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Native community's struggle against it. However, this type of struggle is not unique to that one area of the country.

    In Maui, Hawaii, residents are facing a similar struggle against corporations about their access to water: "Instead of paying market rate for the water from public lands and sharing the proceeds with Native Hawaiians, as required by state law, for decades A&B has taken more than 80% of all public water consumed on the island." The corporation pays $3 per million gallons, while the island's 155,000 residents pay $4,000 for 1 million gallons. 

    This article looks at the intrinsic unfairness of this system and describes the coming together of a number of prominent Hawaii politicians, including Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, against this situation.

  • 12.01.14

    Hawaii's National Climate Assessment

    Climate change is a looming problem for the world. However, many people struggle to understand the true impact of climate change because the terms are difficult to understand in real terms - how will this affect my country? my state? my community? me? The National Climate Assessment breaks down the effects of clim...

    Climate change is a looming problem for the world. However, many people struggle to understand the true impact of climate change because the terms are difficult to understand in real terms - how will this affect my country? my state? my community? me?

    The National Climate Assessment breaks down the effects of climate change into specific regions of the United States. This article specifically focuses on Hawaii. It finds some key changes in Hawaii due to climate change:

    Changes to Marine Ecosystems: Warmer oceans are leading to increased coral bleaching events and disease outbreaks in coral reefs, as well as changed distribution patterns of tuna fisheries. Ocean acidification will reduce coral growth and health. Warming and acidification, combined with existing stresses, will strongly affect coral reef fish communities.

    Decreasing Freshwater Availability: Freshwater supplies are already constrained and will become more limited on many islands. Saltwater intrusion associated with sea level rise will reduce the quantity and quality of freshwater in coastal aquifers, especially on low islands. In areas where precipitation does not increase, freshwater supplies will be adversely affected as air temperature rises.

    Increased Stress on Native Plants and Animals: Increasing temperatures, and in some areas reduced rainfall, will stress native Pacific Island plants and animals, especially in high-elevation ecosystems with increasing exposure to invasive species, increasing the risk of extinctions.

    Sea Level Rising: Rising sea levels, coupled with high water levels caused by tropical and extra-tropical storms, will incrementally increase coastal flooding and erosion, damaging coastal ecosystems, infrastructure, and agriculture, and negatively affecting tourism.

    Threats to Lives, Livelihoods, and Cultures: Mounting threats to food and water security, infrastructure, and public health and safety are expected to lead to increasing human migration from low to high elevation islands and continental sites, making it increasingly difficult for Pacific Islanders to sustain the region’s many unique customs, beliefs, and languages.