Healthcare

  • 02.01.18

    Meet The New Boss, Same as the Old Boss

    The announcement by the CEO's from JP Morgan Chase, Amazon and Berkshire-Hathaway that they are forming a new healthcare company signals the symbolic end of the ACA-reform era....

    The announcement by the CEO’s from JP Morgan Chase, Amazon and Berkshire-Hathaway that they are forming a new healthcare company signals the symbolic end of the ACA-reform era.

  • 11.20.17

    What's at Stake: Healthcare for All

  • 08.01.17

    Medicaid, Explained: Why It's Worse To Be Sick In Some States Than Others

    This video from Vox looks at the Medicaid system through the eyes of an individual on Medicaid, Matthew, who has Crohn's Disease. He is one of the 1 in 5 Americans who get their healthcare paid for by Medicaid. The video states "The thing about Matthew is, if he lived in a different state, he might not have Medic...

    This video from Vox looks at the Medicaid system through the eyes of an individual on Medicaid, Matthew, who has Crohn's Disease. He is one of the 1 in 5 Americans who get their healthcare paid for by Medicaid. 

    The video states “The thing about Matthew is, if he lived in a different state, he might not have Medicaid.” It explains the history of healthcare in the United States, the attempts of certain presidents (FDR, Truman, and LBJ) to create a national healthcare system, the reason behind the emergence of a private healthcare market, and the ultimate expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

    Due to the Supreme Court decision that made this expansion voluntary by state, the video explains that the specific states get to decide who gets covered and what service gets covered. Some individuals are consistently covered across the board, like children and Pregnant women; However, coverage of other groups like individual who make below a certain amount per year are only covered in certain states. 

    The video goes on to describe the rising costs of Medicaid, due to the rising costs of health care in the United States, and ways that Republicans have proposed to change Medicaid.

  • 06.13.17

    Next Steps for CHIP: What is at Stake for Children?

    This article from the Kaiser Family Foundation looks at the specific benefits from the CHIP program. First, it describes how the CHIP program was formed and what it entails: "The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is an important complement to Medicaid, covering 8.9 million children with family incomes abov...

    This article from the Kaiser Family Foundation looks at the specific benefits from the CHIP program. First, it describes how the CHIP program was formed and what it entails: "The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is an important complement to Medicaid, covering 8.9 million children with family incomes above Medicaid eligibility limits who often lack access to affordable private coverage."

    It covers 5 benefits and facts about the program:

    1. Expansions of Medicaid and CHIP have helped reduce the children’s uninsured rate to a record low of 5%.

    2. All states have expanded eligibility for children through Medicaid and CHIP above federal minimum levels.

    3. Medicaid and CHIP are major sources of coverage for our nation’s children.

    4. Medicaid and CHIP cover over half of children of color.

    5. Medicaid and CHIP provide children access to needed care.

    CHIP Figure 1

  • 06.10.17

    Healthcare for All in California

    Michael Lighty, the Director of Public Policy for National Nurses United and a Fellow of the Sanders Institute, gives an in depth lecture on how Senate Bill 562, also known as "The Healthy California Act" would be funded and how it would work with current healthcare coverage. He also provides an economic analysis ...

    Michael Lighty, the Director of Public Policy for National Nurses United and a Fellow of the Sanders Institute, gives an in depth lecture on how Senate Bill 562, also known as  "The Healthy California Act" would be funded and how it would work with current healthcare coverage. He also provides an economic analysis that demonstrates how California is able to provide quality healthcare for all while also saving the state billions of dollars. 

     

  • 05.24.17

    H.R. 1628, American Health Care Act of 2017: Summary of Cost Estimate

    This report from the Congressional Budget Office looks at the recently updated American Healthcare Act (H.R. 1628). It states that "H.R. 1628 would reduce the cumulative federal deficit over the 2017-2026 period by $119 billion. That amount is $32 billion less than the estimated net savings for the [earlier] versi...

    This report from the Congressional Budget Office looks at the recently updated American Healthcare Act (H.R. 1628).

    It states that "H.R. 1628 would reduce the cumulative federal deficit over the 2017-2026 period by $119 billion. That amount is $32 billion less than the estimated net savings for the [earlier] version of H.R. 1628." This reduction to the deficit would largely "come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the replacement of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) subsidies for nongroup health insurance with new tax credits for nongroup health insurance." 

    Unfortunately, more people would be uninsured under this bill than under the current law (the Affordable Care Act/Obamacare): "In 2018, 14 million more people would be uninsured under H.R. 1628 than under current law. The increase in the number of uninsured people relative to the number projected under current law would reach 19 million in 2020 and 23 million in 2026. In 2026, an estimated 51 million people under age 65 would be uninsured, compared with 28 million who would lack insurance that year under current law."

    H.R. 1628 Budget Effects

  • 03.07.17

    How Affordable Care Act Repeal And Replace Plans Might Shift Health Insurance Tax Credits

    After its release, the Kaiser Family Foundation analyzed the new Republican bill, the American Health Care Act. The Kaiser Family Foundation finds that "Both the ACA and the American Health Care Act include tax credits in their approach. However, the law and the proposal calculate credit amounts differently: the ...

    After its release, the Kaiser Family Foundation analyzed the new Republican bill, the American Health Care Act. 

    The Kaiser Family Foundation finds that "Both the ACA and the American Health Care Act include tax credits in their approach. However, the law and the proposal calculate credit amounts differently: the ACA takes family income, local cost of insurance, and age into account, while the replacement proposal bases tax credits only on age, with a phase out for individuals with incomes above $75,000."

    The result of this change in legislation means that in general, people who are older, lower-income, or live in high-premium areas (like Alaska and Arizona) would receive less in tax credits under the new legislation than they do currently under the Affordable Care Act. While those who are younger, higher-income, or live in low-premium areas receive larger assistance under the AHCA than they currently do. 

    The figure below taken from the article shows the differences in tax credits by age and income:

    Kaiser Figure 1

More