Impeachment

  • 10.29.15

    Impeachment and Removal

    Many people have heard the term "impeachment" but few know the intricacies of the impeachment process and what it means to "get impeached." This report from the Congressional Research Service takes a deep dive into the impeachment process, who can be impeached and the presidents and judges who have been impeached...

    Many people have heard the term "impeachment" but few know the intricacies of  the impeachment process and what it means to "get impeached."

    This report from the Congressional Research Service takes a deep dive into the impeachment process, who can be impeached and the presidents and judges who have been impeached.

    Ultimately, "Although the term “impeachment” is commonly used to refer to the removal of a government official from office, the impeachment process, as described in the Constitution, entails two distinct proceedings carried out by the separate houses of Congress. First, a simple majority of the House impeaches—or formally approves allegations of wrongdoing amounting to an impeachable offense, known as articles of impeachment. The articles of impeachment are then forwarded to the Senate where the second proceeding takes place: an impeachment trial. If the Senate, by vote of a two-thirds majority, convicts the official of the alleged offenses, the result is removal from office of those still in office, and, at the Senate’s discretion, disqualification from holding future office."