Migrant

  • 06.16.16

    What Does It Mean To Be A Refugee?

    This video from Ted-Ed describes the difference between migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees: Migrants: "Refers to people who leave their countries for reasons not related to persecution such as searching for better economic opportunities or leaving drought ridden areas in search of better circumstances." Refug...

    This video from Ted-Ed describes the difference between migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees:

    Migrants: "Refers to people who leave their countries for reasons not related to persecution such as searching for better economic opportunities or leaving drought ridden areas in search of better circumstances."

    Refugees: "International law, rightly or wrongly, only recognizes those fleeing conflict and violence as refugees."

    Asylum Seeker: "Once in a new country, the first legal step for a displaced person is to apply for asylum. At this point they are an asylum seeker and not officially recognized as a refugee until the application has been accepted." 

    The video also describes the experiences of many refugees from being displaced from their homes through violence, through their stays in refugee camps, applications for asylum, and then relocation in other countries.

  • 04.30.13

    Effects Of Unauthorized Immigration On The Actuarial Status Of The Social Security Trust Funds

    This report from the Social Security Administration looks at the affect that undocumented immigrants have had on the Social Security funds. It begins with a short overview of the different types of immigrants who may be contributing to the fun. Then it delves into a discussion of how and how much those immigrants...

    This report from the Social Security Administration looks at the affect that undocumented immigrants have had on the Social Security funds. 

    It begins with a short overview of the different types of immigrants who may be contributing to the fun. Then it delves into a discussion of how and how much those immigrants contribute and take from Social Security. It finds that "While unauthorized immigrants worked and contributed as much as $13 billion in payroll taxes to the OASDI program in 2010, only about $1 billion in benefit payments during 2010 are attributable to unauthorized work." Therefore, the authors estimate that "earnings by unauthorized immigrants result in a net positive effect on Social Security financial status generally, and that this effect contributed roughly $12 billion to the cash flow of the program for 2010."

    The report ends with an overview of the laws that affect undocumented immigrants in regards to Social Security and frequently asked questions about the issue.