President Trump

  • 04.20.17

    How Much Can This Planet Stand?

    In this article Bill McKibben talks about the potentially disastrous effects of a policy approach to carbon emissions that ignores the science of climate change. "What I mean is, we have only a short window to deal with the climate crisis or else we forever lose the chance to thwart truly catastrophic heating." M...

    In this article Bill McKibben talks about the potentially disastrous effects of a policy approach to carbon emissions that ignores the science of climate change.

    "What I mean is, we have only a short window to deal with the climate crisis or else we forever lose the chance to thwart truly catastrophic heating."

    McKibben states that many of the aspects of President Trump's approach to energy policy will have longer term effects: "The effects will be felt not immediately but over decades and centuries and millenniums. More ice will melt, and that will cut the planet’s reflectivity, amplifying the warming; more permafrost will thaw, and that will push more methane into the atmosphere, trapping yet more heat. The species that go extinct as a result of the warming won’t mostly die in the next four years, but they will die. The nations that will be submerged won’t sink beneath the waves on his watch, but they will sink. No president will be able to claw back this time — crucial time, since we’re right now breaking the back of the climate system."

  • 04.19.17

    Tohono O'odham Nation Opposes Border Wall

    Building a wall between The United States of America and Mexico was a significant element of the Trump campaign in 2016. While there are many political arguments for and against the wall, it is important to look at the individuals whose day to day lives will be affected by the wall. This video specifically looks a...

    Building a wall between The United States of America and Mexico was a significant element of the Trump campaign in 2016. While there are many political arguments for and against the wall, it is important to look at the individuals whose day to day lives will be affected by the wall.

    This video specifically looks at the Native American nation, Tohono O'odham. It is located at the U.S.-Mexican border in Arizona with elements on both sides of the wall. In the video, individuals from the tribe describe their living situation, and why a wall along the border would change their lives. Ultimately,  they fear that the proposed President Trump border wall would not only sever their land, but also slice through their community and culture.

  • 04.07.17

    Syria's War: Who is Fighting and Why

    This video by Vox describes the complex history and alliances of the Syrian civil war. It begins with the Arab Spring protests in 2011, then describes the transition through multiple foreign powers backing the different sides, the rise of ISIS, through to the decision by the Trump administration to bomb forces rel...

    This video by Vox describes the complex history and alliances of the Syrian civil war.

    It begins with the Arab Spring protests in 2011, then describes the transition through multiple foreign powers backing the different sides, the rise of ISIS, through to the decision by the Trump administration to bomb forces related to Assad - "This is the first time that the United States has directly attacked the Assad regime."

  • 03.14.16

    Are Trade Deals Good For America?

    Both Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump are blaming free-trade deals for the decline of working-class jobs and incomes. Are they right? Robert Reich points out that "America has lost a significant number of factory jobs over the last three decades. In 1980, 1 in 5 Americans worked in manufacturing. Now it's 1 in 12."...

    Both Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump are blaming free-trade deals for the decline of working-class jobs and incomes. Are they right?

    Robert Reich points out that "America has lost a significant number of factory jobs over the last three decades. In 1980, 1 in 5 Americans worked in manufacturing. Now it’s 1 in 12."

    Reich explains that the reduction in manufacturing jobs is as a result of a number of factors including automation and technology, as well as increasing trade. However, Reich explains that the loss of manufacturing jobs through better technology and more trade is not necessarily a bad thing. Instead, it is bad because "trade has widened inequality and imposed a particular burden on America’s blue-collar workers" without offering an opportunity for those workers to enter other professions."The core problem isn’t really free trade, or even the loss of factory jobs per se. It’s the demise of an entire economic system in which people with only high-school degrees, or less, could count on good and secure jobs."

    The article ends with an appeal from Reich that "Trade has contributed to the loss of this old system, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we should give up on free trade. We should create a new system, in which a greater share of Americans can be winners."