Water

  • 06.22.17

    The Nina Turner Show: Appalachians Rising

    At the 2017 People's Summit, Nina Turner talks to organizers from West Virginia and Ohio about the challenges of living and affecting change in rural America....

    At the 2017 People’s Summit, Nina Turner talks to organizers from West Virginia and Ohio about the challenges of living and affecting change in rural America.

  • 04.11.17

    From Standing Rock To Maui: Tulsi Gabbard Joins Resistance To A&B’s Massive Water Theft

    Many people have heard about the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Native community's struggle against it. However, this type of struggle is not unique to that one area of the country. In Maui, Hawaii, residents are facing a similar struggle against corporations about their access to water: "Instead of paying market ...

    Many people have heard about the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Native community's struggle against it. However, this type of struggle is not unique to that one area of the country.

    In Maui, Hawaii, residents are facing a similar struggle against corporations about their access to water: "Instead of paying market rate for the water from public lands and sharing the proceeds with Native Hawaiians, as required by state law, for decades A&B has taken more than 80% of all public water consumed on the island." The corporation pays $3 per million gallons, while the island's 155,000 residents pay $4,000 for 1 million gallons. 

    This article looks at the intrinsic unfairness of this system and describes the coming together of a number of prominent Hawaii politicians, including Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, against this situation.

  • 04.04.17

    Kansas City Water Rates and Rivers

    The average water bill in Kansas City Missouri has risen by 240% since 2000. Why? This video from Kansas City Public television looks at the Blue River: who is polluting it, and who is paying to clean it up. It finds that the lower income areas are those with the worst water quality because they are downstream fro...

    The average water bill in Kansas City Missouri has risen by 240% since 2000. Why?

    This video from Kansas City Public television looks at the Blue River: who is polluting it, and who is paying to clean it up. It finds that the lower income areas are those with the worst water quality because they are downstream from where most of the pollution occurs, and yet they are the ones most adversely affected by increases in water prices. Specifically, since 2008 KC Water has cut off almost 140,000 accounts; meaning that 140,000 people were deprived of water because they could not keep up with the rising costs.

    It is a social justice issue that few are talking about.